The art and craft of pysanky

Posts tagged “life

A Duck Tale

Her name is Fiona.  At least that’s what I call this duck nesting in my yard.  She actually belongs to my neighbor but kept finding her way back into my yard.  Every day my neighbor would take her back home but Fiona got what she wanted.  One day I found her sitting firmly on a nest and knew she was here to stay, at least until those eggs hatched.Fionasitting

 

A month is a long time to sit on a nest, but Fiona did her job well.  She returned home very briefly morning and evening to eat but the rest of the time she sat…and sat…and sat.  I found the nest empty once so I reached my hand in carefully to feel how many eggs she had.  Unfortunately Fiona was just returning to my yard and she did not take kindly to me touching her precious eggs.  Did you know ducks can hiss?  And run really fast when they want to?  It’s scary!

 

The big day arrived when nine little yellow puffballs followed their mama around my yard.  There is nothing cuter than a baby duck!  We ran out to snap a few photos, steering clear of Fiona’s fiercely protective pecks then left them alone to find their way back into our neighbor’s yard.IMG_20140424_164839

 

Fast forward a couple of days and now Fiona and her brood are regular visitors to our koi pond.  She takes them back to her own yard to eat and sleep, but at least three times a day they make a field trip to go swimming.  It would have been fine if they just swam, but now they were starting to dig in our plants and muddy up the water.  I wondered what the fish thought of their new neighbors so I watched carefully.  One of our bigger koi started nibbling on a baby duck’s paddling foot and that baby just gave him a good peck.  Problem solved.  I laughed at their antics but I knew we had to do something because I was tired of dealing with the muddy pond.swimming1

 

Last week as the ducks swam happily I found their secret entrance to my yard.  Now to get the ducks out of the pond and back to their own home.  I tried shooing them but that didn’t work very well.  Next I used my arms and a pond skimmer which helped with the herding somewhat.  I managed to get them back to the fence near their escape route but Fiona held her ground pretty well and wasn’t much interested in taking her babies home.

 

Next idea…maybe if I could grab a couple of babies and push them underneath the fence she’d take the hint.  I herded them all against the fence and got close enough to pick up two babies and push them into the yard next door.  Fiona went ballistic at that and started attacking me…and ducks peck hard!  I managed to get another duckling under the fence when all of a sudden Fiona nipped the tender skin of my forearm and hung on for dear life.hatched

 

It’s funny how your brain can operate on a couple of different levels at once.  As I raised up my arm with the mama duck hanging in midair, one part of me thought, “That’s not right…and it hurts!”  But the other part of my brain said, “Hey she’s occupied, now’s my chance to get the rest of those babies out of here.”  So with my free hand I kept grabbing and shoving until all the babies were next door peeping for their mama.  Fiona let go and I was able to catch her and shove her under the fence too.  Whew!  It took a couple of cement blocks to fill the space but we haven’t had any more duck visitations since then.

 

I kind of miss them already.  I think this is what the empty nest syndrome feels like.emptynest


Broken Bits

Maybe it’s my “almost-an-empty-nester” stage but more and more I find myself taking stock of where I am in life, where I thought I would be at this age, and wondering what I will become in the future.  And of course those dreaded comparisons and regrets start creeping in.  The what-ifs and why-didn’t-I’s can all too easily overwhelm me and take away the joy of the present.

A while back I came across a line about allowing God to transform the broken places in your life into prisms.  Can’t you just see that?  What a beautiful word picture of redemption and hope.  That idea has been rolling around in the back of my head for a while and so I began to review my life again.  What if I start looking at my faults as prisms reflecting God’s beauty outside of my selfish little world?  How this happens I don’t know but I’m holding onto God’s goodness and grace and letting Him be in charge, or at least I’m trying to.

I love when God whispers His truth to me through my art.  I love it even more when I pay attention and actually listen.  Over the years I have collected quite a pile of broken eggs.  Some were completed and accidentally cracked.  Some didn’t turn out as I’d hoped and were abandoned partway through the process.  I couldn’t bring myself to toss any of them so they just sat in a drawer collecting dust.  Every time I opened the drawer they shouted at me that I had failed in some way.

Now what if I used those broken bits somehow?  Could I really transform them into something more?  After a lot of experimentation I can finally say yes.

GreenrosetteThese egg mosaics have been a challenge and a delight to create.  I’m still discovering new ways to improve my designs and having fun in the process.  Not only that, I will be teaching a class on this technique at the Pysanky USA retreat in Pennsylvania next week.

Pinkpurple2

So this is what redemption looks like.Matrushka


Playing It Safe

Years ago we added onto our house and remodeled our kitchen, a project I had dreamed of for decades.  New cabinets, new floor, new appliances, and new countertops…a dream come true.  In all the decisions that come with a big project like this, the most stressful for me was choosing the countertop.  Fairly quickly I decided on the material, but picking the color was another story.  House décor trends called for warm tans and golds but I really prefer the cool colors like white, grey, and especially blue.  I knew this was a once-in-my-lifetime commitment and I didn’t want to make a mistake so I spent most of my time debating over light colors like grey and white.  They were all nice, clean-looking, neutral (because what if we had to sell the house???) and I didn’t love any of them, but they were all “safe.”

In the midst of all this, I spoke with my sister about my color angst.  She listened patiently and then said, “If you really like blue, then pick blue.”  What?  Blue countertops?  I’d never seen it in any fancy kitchen magazine, or home show, or in real life either.  Who would put blue counters in a kitchen?  It’s just not done!  At least that was my initial reaction.  But the more I thought about it, the more I realized she was right.  I like blue.  In fact, I love blue, and this was my kitchen, and I plan to live here with those countertops for a good long time and who cares about resale value?

I realized my reluctance to choose blue came from a desire to do the reasonable thing, to play it “safe,” to not make waves, to not attract attention, or ruffle anyone’s feathers.  And that is my nature.  I like being behind the scenes, unnoticed, invisible.  But that’s not really how God calls us to live, is it?  A life spend hiding is a life half-lived.  How many experiences have I missed because I wasn’t willing to be bold?  To put my toe outside my comfort zone and risk a little?

These days I still love my blue countertops and I’m so glad I didn’t go the safe neutral route.  Now if I could only remember that lesson every single day…


Etching

Normally the designs on these eggs fill the eye with color but if I use the same wax-resist technique in a slightly different way the resulting monotones are surprisingly beautiful.

A bit of explanation here.  A brown chicken egg is only brown on the outer surface.  Just underneath that dark layer it gets progressively lighter and lighter until the shell become nearly white.  To decorate these eggs I use acid to eat away layers of shell and reveal what’s underneath.  And by protecting my design with beeswax, I can preserve the darker colors on the finished egg.

As I worked on a sample etched egg for a class, God began to whisper a metaphor to me about the process of etching.  Acid is tough on the egg, but getting down to the pure white layer is the only way to reveal the beautiful design created by the darker outer shell.

This is the part that started me thinking.  Often when life doesn’t go as planned, I grumble and complain.  I like my familiar, dark “outer layers” and that “acid” in my everyday life interferes with my personal agenda.  But if I sit in the moment instead of avoiding the hard stuff, I come away changed in some way…hopefully for the better.  God can make my deep, dark outer layer into a beautiful, intricate design if I give Him space to work.  He doesn’t take away my faults, He just transforms them into a thing of beauty.  Wow, that’s a lot to ponder.

If you’d like to try your hand at acid etched eggs, I’ll be teaching this class March 24, 2012, at Craftology in Fair OaksVillage.  Here is the link for more details

Do Over

This time of year often brings thoughts about new beginnings but a profound insight hit me recently.  As I reached for a fresh egg to begin yet another project I realized that each egg gives me another chance to have fun, to change my approach, to improve my skill, to make a completely different egg than the last one.  In other words, every egg is a “do over.”  And I am so thankful that I don’t have to be stuck with the past, but can grow and change and develop as an artist as I work on the next egg.

Here’s the amazing thing though.  This principle applies not just to egg art, but to life as well.  All of life is one big “potential” when you think about it.  Each day is a “do over” that waits for me to move forward one small step at a time.  I really like that perspective.  So look out 2012, here I come.


A Matter of Perspective

My husband, Dave, is quite tall and I am not so it has led to many interesting “discussions” over the years.  Hanging a wall picture practically guarantees the inevitable “height war.”  Higher, lower, no higher, how about here, no lower and eventually we settle on some middle ground which neither satisfies nor offends either of us.

And while I sincerely appreciate the fact that Dave can reach a serving dish in a high cupboard so I don’t have to climb onto the counter to get it, there are other times when it’s irritating dealing with things like a car seat so far back I can’t even touch the pedals.  There’s no getting around it, we just live in different height worlds.

A while back Dave called me to look out our window onto the backyard.  “Isn’t it beautiful?” he asked.  I couldn’t see anything but dim shadows of trees and was frankly wondering what my thoroughly analytical, practical husband was talking about.

“There, look at the pond,” he said, and still I saw nothing out of the ordinary.  “Don’t you see the full moon reflecting off the water?” he asked.

Mystified, I answered no.  That’s when it hit us both.  Dave could see it and I couldn’t because I wasn’t tall enough.  When I stood on a chair the landscape changed dramatically and a brilliant full moon sparkled on the black pond water like none I had ever seen before.  It was a gorgeous sight, but one that I simply couldn’t see until I changed my perspective.

I learned a valuable lesson that night.  Sometimes a change in perspective makes all the difference.


If a Tree Falls in the Forest…

Sharing our art with others brings up the question, “Is it still art even if no one else ever sees it?”  I used to think the answer was a total yes, but now I’m not so sure.  Art has both a giving and a receiving aspect.  It involves both the artist and the art patron.  I believe it was actually meant to be shared with a wider audience and not hoarded by its creator.

As some of you may know, in addition to being an egg artist, I also play the cello.  I have been taking lessons for a while now and find it’s the most absorbing and yet most difficult thing I’ve ever attempted.  I work hard when I practice and enjoy it tremendously.  What I don’t enjoy are the recitals my teacher schedules two or three times each year.  Thankfully he has separate ones for his younger and older students.  Believe me, it really helps to know I won’t have to follow a fourth grader playing a piece much more difficult than mine.  Still, I get nervous at the thought of playing in public.  And just so you understand how much of a weenie I am, this particular “public” is only the other adult students and sometimes a few family members.  Even so, it is PUBLIC playing, not my usual me-and-the-cello-with-the-door-to-the-rest-of-the-house-closed.

I’ve been told repeatedly that the more you do something, the easier it gets.  I know lots of “real musicians” who say they love playing before an audience.  I have to say I’m still waiting for that to happen with me.  On the feeling scale from “terrifying to fun,” my score is still a lot closer to terrified.  But I keep at it because I want to be able to share my music with others.  As a growth area in my life, this is not easy but I’m convinced it’s absolutely necessary.  My prayer is that I will continue to step outside my comfortable boundaries to see what God has in store for me out there.  In the meantime, I  have to go practice!