The art and craft of pysanky

Posts tagged “Christian life

Intersections 2012

I believe God built into each of us a desire for community, both with Him and with our fellow travelers on this earth.  As an artist, I find that rubbing elbows with other artists inspires my in my art and in my spiritual walk in a way nothing else does.  And I don’t get to experience that very often.  That’s why I so look forward to the annual conference on faith and art called Intersections, held at Oak Hills Church in Folsom, California.

This conference covers a broad range of the arts, from drama, to dance, to music, to film, to visual, technical, and even the culinary arts.  Throughout the day we were encouraged to use the supplies on our tables to paint a small section of plastic that we could stick to a window in the back of the auditorium.  As the day progressed, so did our group “stained glass window.”

The visual artists were easy to spot.  They dove right into the paints and started producing multiple pieces right away.  I found watching the non-visual artists even more interesting.  In some I saw the initial reluctance give way to experimentation and finally a joy at simply playing with paint.

Even more fun, was watching people add their painted pieces to the growing design on the window.  Intricate designs and plain colored pieces randomly combined to create beauty where before there was nothing but empty space.

Great speakers, God-breathed conversations, and thought-provoking words filled our time together.  The icing on the cake for me came as we wrapped up at the end of the day.  With the light from outside shining in, our group “stained glass window” became a physical representation of community to me.  And I needed that.  I really needed that.  In fact, we all do.


Do Over

This time of year often brings thoughts about new beginnings but a profound insight hit me recently.  As I reached for a fresh egg to begin yet another project I realized that each egg gives me another chance to have fun, to change my approach, to improve my skill, to make a completely different egg than the last one.  In other words, every egg is a “do over.”  And I am so thankful that I don’t have to be stuck with the past, but can grow and change and develop as an artist as I work on the next egg.

Here’s the amazing thing though.  This principle applies not just to egg art, but to life as well.  All of life is one big “potential” when you think about it.  Each day is a “do over” that waits for me to move forward one small step at a time.  I really like that perspective.  So look out 2012, here I come.


A Matter of Perspective

My husband, Dave, is quite tall and I am not so it has led to many interesting “discussions” over the years.  Hanging a wall picture practically guarantees the inevitable “height war.”  Higher, lower, no higher, how about here, no lower and eventually we settle on some middle ground which neither satisfies nor offends either of us.

And while I sincerely appreciate the fact that Dave can reach a serving dish in a high cupboard so I don’t have to climb onto the counter to get it, there are other times when it’s irritating dealing with things like a car seat so far back I can’t even touch the pedals.  There’s no getting around it, we just live in different height worlds.

A while back Dave called me to look out our window onto the backyard.  “Isn’t it beautiful?” he asked.  I couldn’t see anything but dim shadows of trees and was frankly wondering what my thoroughly analytical, practical husband was talking about.

“There, look at the pond,” he said, and still I saw nothing out of the ordinary.  “Don’t you see the full moon reflecting off the water?” he asked.

Mystified, I answered no.  That’s when it hit us both.  Dave could see it and I couldn’t because I wasn’t tall enough.  When I stood on a chair the landscape changed dramatically and a brilliant full moon sparkled on the black pond water like none I had ever seen before.  It was a gorgeous sight, but one that I simply couldn’t see until I changed my perspective.

I learned a valuable lesson that night.  Sometimes a change in perspective makes all the difference.


Lenten Prayer Project

It is such a privilege to connect my spiritual life and my art…and to see it reach farther than I ever thought possible boggles my mind.  Recently I submitted a photo of my work to Clayfire Curator and just yesterday found out it was chosen as part of a Lenten Prayer Project.

Lent, the season of reflection leading to Easter, brings to mind different images to different people.  Growing up it always meant giving up something important to me, like candy.  Avoiding sweets didn’t usually last very long, and then it was merely a matter of confessing my sin and waiting for the Easter bunny to bring goodies.

Last year my Lenten experience changed that mental image dramatically.  Preparing for a gallery show of my pysanky and working only in black and white challenged me both as an artist and a Christ-follower.  Through that experience I understood, possibly for the first time, what it really means to depend on God for my very next step.  And the celebration of Easter felt so much sweeter with the joy of adding color back to my work.

I don’t know what Lent will hold for me this year, but I find myself looking forward to learning more about myself and about God through it all.  What about you?


Giving Yourself Grace

Creating these eggs is a never-ending adventure in experimentation and I’ve made my share of poor color and design choices over the years.  It took me quite a while to realize it is okay to dislike a piece enough to destroy it and try again.  Now I give myself permission to cut my losses and move on sometimes.  It hasn’t always been this way, though.

Let me tell you the story of what we refer to in my family as “The Ugly Cake.”  Years ago when my oldest son, Ryan, turned 14 I decided to try making an ice cream roll birthday cake like the ones at Baskin-Robbins.  The yellow cake part baked without incident and I dutifully rolled it up in a towel when it came out of the oven just like the cookbook said.  As I finished rolling it, I noticed a wrinkle in the towel so without thinking, I stretched the two side edges to get rid of the wrinkle.  Unfortunately the hot cake was firmly attached to the towel at this point and it split crosswise into two rolls.  Oh well, I thought to myself.  I can glue it together with the ice cream filling.  No one will ever know.

Once cooled, I gently unrolled the cake to find that not only had it split into two rolls, it unrolled with a series of cracks so deep that I could see the towel below.  Still believing I had a chance, I dutifully spread softened chocolate ice cream over the pieces of cake and rolled it back up as I went.  I could tell it looked pretty pitiful at this point, but hoping for the best, I stuck it in the freezer.

When I checked later, I realized the ice cream must have been too soft because the weight of the cake caused it to ooze out of all the edges of the cake.  Alarmed, I yanked it out of the freezer with perhaps a little too much vigor.  Because the ice cream wasn’t hard all the way through the cake, the top half slid right over the edge of the pan and onto my arm.

Ever the optimist, I scooted the pieces back together and decided I could still save it if I just made a chocolate glaze and covered up what I now referred to as the “Ugly Cake.”  I quickly threw together a decadent shiny chocolate glaze to try to hide the many mounting flaws.  However, I forgot the cake was cold and instead of flowing gracefully over its sides, the warm glaze just sat in a lump on the top of the mess.

Desperate now, I spread the glaze as far as it would go, shoved the cake back in the freezer, and drove with Ryan to Baskin-Robbins where we chose a cake from the many beauties in their freezer.  I did finally show the “Ugly Cake” to the rest of the family and we had a good laugh at my adventure.

The lesson here?  There are definitely times to admit your mistakes, give up, and move on.  You might even laugh about them someday.