The art and craft of pysanky

Posts tagged “arts camp

Arts Camp 2014 Recap

Here’s a glimpse of our week at Oak Hills Church Arts Camp!

 

God blessed me with 12 wonderfully creative 5th and 6th grade girls, two loving shepherd helpers and a calm and cheerful assistant teacher this year.  Together we learned about God and His love for us while we learned the art of pysanky and how to create these jeweled wonders.  We also learned that occasionally eggs break but life goes on because you get to start over on a new egg.

All valuable life lessons in my book.


Arts Camp 2014

VA56_Pysanky-7

Once again I’ll be teaching a week-long class of 5th and 6th graders how to create pysanky.  Oak Hills Church in Folsom, California, bursts with activity as the campus transforms into a vast studio of kids and volunteers all focused on finding God through the arts.

 

Dance, music, theater, visual arts, creative craftsmanship, and even culinary arts come alive as we all learn how to nurture our creative souls.

 

For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

 


Arts Camp 2013

Arts Camp 2013 classThere is nothing better than combining kids and God and art all at the same time.  That’s what Arts Camp at Oak Hills Church does…and does very well I might add.  Our Children’s Pastor, Colleen Gray and her amazing team turn our church campus and hundreds of volunteers into a smooth-running, exciting, enthusiastic machine where nearly three hundred kids get to experience God for a whole week through arts such as Dance, Theater, Music, Visual Arts, Creative Craftsmanship, and Culinary Arts.

VA56_Pysanky-7

The seven fifth/sixth grade girls in my pysanky class accomplished much more than any previous year’s class.  Most of them finished four eggs and some more than that.  I beamed as they proudly showed their parents the results of their focused work in class.  And their excitement spilled over at home as parent after parent reported back to me how their child couldn’t stop talking about their eggs and how sad they were when Friday finally arrived.

VA56_Pysanky-13 VA56_Pysanky-16 VA56_Pysanky-37 VA56_Pysanky-43 VA56_Pysanky-46It’s an exhausting week but well worth the effort.  After a few days of restorative quiet here at home, I find myself wondering…is it too soon to start looking forward to Arts Camp next year?VA56_Pysanky-39


Passing It On

More than thirty years ago in my former life (those days before marriage and children) I worked as a registered nurse first in a hospital and then in a doctor’s office.  Another life chapter began when I started teaching Body & Soul, an international program that combines faith and fitness.  Twenty three years later I’m still leading my fitness class weekly and have also been speaking and demonstrating the art of pysanky to individuals and small groups whenever the opportunity arises.

As I reflect back on all those experiences I noticed a common thread…teaching.  I never thought of myself as a teacher before but the more I thought about it, the more it makes sense.  Even when I worked as a nurse, the part I liked best was that one-on-one time teaching.

I delight in taking complex topics, breaking them down to understandable pieces, and communicating those ideas in a simple way the listener can grasp.  I also love the challenge of coming up with different ways to transmit knowledge to help the student gain success.  And I especially love seeing that student’s eyes light up with understanding when the “light bulb” turns on at last.

Arts Camp Pysanky 2In a couple of weeks I get to teach another group of fifth and sixth grade students all about this egg art called pysanky.  Arts Camp 2013 at Oak Hills Church in Folsom is one of the highlights of my year.  Students from first through sixth grade come together for a week of fun and excitement where they explore a particular art and in the process learn more about the God who created them.

If you know of a student who might be interested, it’s not too late to sign up for this great adventure.  My class still has a few spots left and I know there are openings in a wide variety of other arts as well.  For more information, click here.

Let the fun begin!


Arts Camp 2011

What a joy to spend a high energy week teaching kids about art and God.  And I don’t say that very often because I highly value my personal, quiet spaces in life.  I am definitely not a high-energy extrovert but I love watching kids blossom as they discover their own artist within.

This year’s class was the best ever.  My five fifth and sixth grade girls picked up the basics of using the wax and dyes very quickly and soon began experimenting with colors and designs on their own eggs.  And best of all, as they concentrated our classroom became a tiny quiet oasis amidst the chaos of over 400 smiling kids, helpers, teachers, musicians, and support staff across the Oak Hills Church campus.  I think my class, students and teachers alike, especially enjoyed that part of each day.

The week finished on a high note with a Friday night Showcase for all the parents.  Afterwards exhausted but excited, I found myself already looking forward to next year’s Arts Camp.  Incredible, isn’t it?  In spite of the hectic schedule, the crazy hours, and the energy it took many of us felt this same way.  It’s a God thing.


Arts Camp 2010

How can I describe the amazing experience we call Arts Camp at Oak Hills Church.  You just had to be there.  The air tingles with high energy and excitement as 360 first through sixth graders plus over 100 adult and student helpers explore all forms of art.  Everywhere you go on campus you see kids in their classes learning dance, drama, music, painting, silk screening, woodworking, even the culinary arts and lots more.

For the second year now, I had the privilege of teaching ten fifth/sixth graders how to create pysanky eggs.  It’s always a little scary to combine kids and candle flames but thanks to plenty of supervision and a couple of mini fire drills, we had no major mishaps.  Most of my students managed to finish at least three eggs over the course of this week.  And more than that, I could see that they really understood the step by step process as they designed and completed projects on their own.

The techniques as well as the historical significance of pysanky have been handed down through the ages from parent to child, from teacher to student, from one generation to another.  And now, I’m proud to say, a new generation of pysanky artists is well on its way to carrying on this tradition.